Get started freelance writing

Get started freelance writing

Freelancing is just one option

One of the ways I earn my full-time income without a job or a boss is by freelancing, and the route I chose was freelance writing. Now, that may not be the same route you decide to go and that’s fine – you may hate writing. There are many other ways to go, affiliate marketing is another good example.

My guide will help you get started regardless of the route you choose.

It contains useful advice that can be applied to ANY online business – I’m using freelancing as a real-world example that has made me thousands of dollars and allowed me to work full-time online.


Here's what we'll cover

– Can I REALLY learn how to make money freelancing online?
– About my guide
– Freelancer vs Affiliate Marketer vs Entrepreneur
– Your freelancing roadmap
– Why climbing the corporate ladder is history
– Get started freelance writing – the key to success
– What’s in it for the client?
– Understand your comfort zone, but don’t make excuses
– Earn money freelance writing by getting your head right
– Don’t swap one boss for another boss
– The truth about a website, portfolio and testimonials
– Raise your prices as soon as possible (another mindset thing)
– You’re Building a real business
– What kind of work can you do as a freelancer?
– Don’t believe the Upwork hype!
– How to build your Upwork profile the right way
– Get tooled up
– Getting paid by clients
– Summing it all up


Can I REALLY learn how to make money freelancing online?

You’re probably asking yourself that question right now if you’re just about to get started freelance writing, and the answer is a definite yes – you can learn how to earn money freelance writing like I do.

I started with no clients, no income and no real idea of what I was doing, to be honest.

Fast forward today and I’ve educated myself, invested time and effort in my business and I work with some top clients making $1,000’s every month.

I have no doubt in my mind that if I can do it, you can do it too.

Here’s a snapshot of my earnings from just one freelance site I’m using right now.

Bear a couple of things in mind:

  • I took the snapshot today and it’s only Tuesday – I still have the rest of the week to go (see Work in progress).
  • This is just part of my income, I also have “direct” freelancing clients that don’t go through job sites (and other income streams as well).
get started freelance writing
Updated for Feb 2019

About my guide

When I set out to write this freelancing guide, my vision was to cover all the basics you need to know if you want to get started freelance writing and earn a full or part-time living. I wanted to make it complete, yet as concise as possible. I wanted to make it the most helpful single piece of information about how to make money freelancing online you’ll ever read.

By its nature, it’s a guide that will never be complete. I’ll need to update it from time to time as new ideas and information come to light.

That said, it’s intended to be the essential guide that forms the foundation of the FYF website. So, if you feel something needs to be added or amended to benefit our community, drop me a line. Your input might just help someone struggling to earn money freelance writing and get them the breakthrough they need to realize their dream.


Freelancer vs affiliate marketer vs entrepreneur

Everyone will have some idea of what is meant by freelancing and being a freelancer. Here’s a useful one-sentence definition:

A freelancer is self-employed and usually a “solopreneur” who solves problems by delivering in-demand services.

A decent enough description, but I’d go one step further.

You see, I understand what you really want is “a business that earns you the income you need to live life on your terms” – AKA financial freedom.

Whichever way you look at it, a freelancer is an entrepreneur in the same way that an affiliate marketer who sells someone else’s product or service to make money is an entrepreneur.

So, let’s not get hung up on definitions. Let’s cover some basics to help you get started and, ultimately, decide which path you want to follow.


Your freelancing roadmap

get started freelance writing

In this guide, I’ll arm you with the essential knowledge you need to get started on your own freelancing journey. I’ll answer the questions I wish I’d had the answers to when I decided to learn how to make money freelancing online – a road that led me to become a full-time freelance writer.

The information I share with you here is based on real-world freelancing experience and targeted to help you earn money freelance writing; here’s some of what we’ll cover:

  • The background to what’s really happening in freelancing and why you should seriously consider if it’s for you.
  • Why armed with the right information and help, you can earn money freelance writing, easily replace your job and create a serious full-time income.
  • Provide you with the essential, actionable information you need to understand what’s required to become a freelancer.
  • Give you a basic framework on which to model your freelancing business.
  • Help you avoid mistakes you’ll likely make if you simply take a “trial and error” approach to freelancing.

There’s a big problem with most of the advice you’ll discover about how to get started freelance writing – it’s usually full of generalizations that leave you guessing as to the exact steps you need to take to build a successful freelancing business.

For example, you’ll be told to market yourself without being given the detailed guidance you need to understand how to do it efficiently using the right tools.

In this post, you’ll learn the next step you need to take if you’re serious and determined to take action to get started freelance writing.

FYF is a community committed to delivering solid, actionable freelancing guidance.

But first…


Why climbing the corporate ladder is history

Freelancing is changing the way we work rapidly and beyond all recognition.

Technology and the internet mean you no longer need to be confined to a traditional 9-5 job. More and more workers are rejecting the 9-5 grind of a traditional job, staying with a single employer for years and selling their soul on the corporate ladder for meaningless promotions and a couple of weeks’ vacation each year.

Millions have taken to freelancing for the chance to work independently, set their own schedules and choose the work they do, escaping a boss they hate in the process. Others earn money freelance writing to subsidize a pension or other fixed income.

How big is the freelancing pie? Very big. If we take just one example, Upwork.com has 3.6 million clients (people looking for freelancers) and they have 9 million freelancers in 180 countries worldwide. And that’s just one platform!

It’s clear. Whatever your reason for considering freelancing, the opportunity to make your own living on your own terms has never been greater.

My #1 recommendation to kickstart or grow your freelance writing business


Get started freelance writing – the key to success

get started freelance writing

A great way to approach freelancing is to think of yourself as a problem solver.

Your potential client has a problem and your job is to convince them you can solve it for them quickly and without hassles.

You must also be able to deliver on your promise of course. 🙂

If you get this right, you’ll get work. If you can make yourself indispensable to your clients, you’ll get lots of work. I know of freelancers who have become such a key part of their client’s business that they’ve had their rates increased without even asking for it!


What’s in it for the client?

When you get started freelance writing, it’s easy to underestimate your value to potential clients, but there are several benefits they get out of the arrangement:

  • The opportunity to access an affordable alternative to a full-time employee.
  • They can cherry pick the skills they need.
  • Deal with a responsive, highly skilled specialist for a fixed cost.

And clients are prepared to pay well for the services of a competent freelancer. How well? Personally, I’ve earned up to $150 per hour. Others have earned more, $200, $300 per hour, and yes even $500 per hour in some cases!

But, we’re getting ahead of ourselves, let’s start planning your own freelancing journey.


Understand your comfort zone, but don’t make excuses

Everyone has a different appetite for, or aversion to, risk.

Very few freelancers study how to make money freelancing online and become successful immediately. It takes time to organize your freelancing business, reach out to clients and land work. How long? That’s not an easy question to answer as the time taken to build a job replacing income varies for everyone.

That said, a reasonable rule of thumb would be to allow 3-6 months to get established and start seeing a steady income stream. Some people do it as quickly as their first month.

Important: It’s a bad idea to quit your job and dive into freelancing expecting to make quick money. It can happen, but a better approach is to make sure you have 3-6 months of funds available to cover your expenses as you build your freelancing business.

So, work out your budgets and make sure you don’t run out of cash before you’ve mastered how to make money freelancing online. If that means you need to continue working for a while and build your business around your job, then that’s the way to go. Many successful freelancers have done just that.

Equally important: If you’ve just found your first excuse not to get started freelance writing, then I suggest you walk away now. Really. Your journey to financial freedom through freelancing will not be without its challenges. If you’re the type of person who…

  1. Is lazy and not prepared to put in the effort.
  2. Looks for excuses and someone else to blame at every turn.
  3. Wants a silver bullet to make a quick buck.

…then freelancing is not for you. You need to want it enough to make it happen.

Enough said.

And that brings us nicely to mindset.


Earn money freelance writing by getting your head right

There are a couple of important things to say about mindset.

As a freelancer, you’ll have no boss telling you what to do. You’ll be making all the decisions including who you work with, when you work, how long you work, how you manage your time etc.

In simple terms, you’ll need to manage and motivate yourself.

One of the first things you’ll want to work out is when you do your best work. Some freelancers like to work early in the morning while others are night owls. If you need to hold down a job while you get started, you’ll need to work around that as well.

Really important mindset tip

Whilst learning how to make money freelancing online, you’ll probably take on any work that comes along. This isn’t a problem while you’re finding your feet, gaining experience and building a portfolio and testimonials (more on that later).

But, whatever you do don’t get trapped in a long-term cycle of low paying jobs; a classic mistake made by many freelancers.

Even if you start by writing 800-word articles on a subject you have zero interest in for $25 (I did) you should be firmly focused on:

  1. Finding higher paying work.
  2. Working your way up the client value chain by solving customer problems, becoming part of your customer’s team and making yourself indispensable.
  3. Putting your prices up (regularly in the early stages).

You need to stay focused on ultimately getting paid what you’re worth, even if you start out at a lower rate. People often ask what’s the secret to getting paid up to $150/ hr.

I’ll reveal the answer right now – ask for it!

That comment is not as facetious as it might seem at first glance. If you’re afraid to ask for a higher rate, don’t expect your customer or prospect to offer it. You’re in the driving seat with your freelancing career, never forget that.

Which reminds me …


Don’t swap one boss for another

get started freelance writing

Being in control of your own destiny and the opportunity to earn money freelance writing is available to everyone. The harder (or smarter) you’re prepared to work while you master how to make money freelancing online, the more money you’ll earn.

To make the most of that freedom it’s important to remember that it’s YOUR business and YOU make the decisions.

You don’t need to work for unreasonable clients who treat you as if you’re a lowly paid employee.

My best advice – fire them!

Don’t become anyone’s doormat and definitely don’t swap one boss for another.

My #1 recommendation to kickstart or grow your freelance writing business


The truth about a website, portfolio and testimonials

It’s possible to get started freelance writing without a website, portfolio or testimonials. That’s exactly what I did when I started out.

I started on Upwork and concentrated on writing the very best proposal I could to try and land the gig. You’d be surprised just how bad some of the cover letters freelancers send on Upwork are, as I discovered when I started posting jobs there. It’s clear the applicant has not even read the details of the job posting more times than not.

While we’re on the subject of applying for jobs on Upwork, don’t EVER send a stock, cut and paste cover letter – that will virtually guarantee you kill off any chance you have of landing a job.

But, if you want to graduate to the more highly paid jobs, a decent website with a portfolio and social proof (in the form of customer testimonials) is pretty much essential.

Start building your website early. Whether you build it yourself or get someone to do it for you, a decent website should be near the top of your priority list.

Note: It doesn’t have to be overkill right at the start. The basics you need are a homepage that clearly states what you offer, an about page that tells your story, a contact page, testimonials, and your portfolio. I would highly suggest starting a blog as well.


Raise your prices as soon as possible (another mindset thing)

Stay focused on expanding and improving your client base as your experience and confidence grow. As you grow, take your existing clients with you AKA raise your prices. If they appreciate your work (make sure they do) and the value you bring to their business, they’ll grow with you.

If they absolutely won’t or can’t financially, consider replacing them with more lucrative work. After all, why would you continue to work for $30 / hour when you could be earning $75 / hour or more? Makes no sense, right?

I’m not suggesting you treat clients as a disposable commodity, far from it, but you make money online freelance writing and you can only work so many hours a day, week or month. You absolutely need to maximize your return for the work you do.


You’re building a real business

get started freelance writing

Freelancing is a real business and one capable of providing you with a substantial income if you take it seriously, and taking it seriously means setting goals. It’s important you know where you’re at and where you’re going.

Using the SMART system is a good way to set goals.

Specific – make sure what you’re planning to achieve is clearly stated.

Measurable – you have a way to determine if you’ve achieved your goal or not.

Attainable – don’t set unrealistic goals.

Relevant – set goals that directly enhance your business.

Time-based – daily, weekly, monthly

An example of a bad goal:

I will increase my turnover by getting new clients.

An example of a good goal:

By the 30th of this month, I will secure another regular client who will pay me a retainer of at least $1,000 per month.


What kind of work can you do as a freelancer?

There’s so much talk about niche selection, I could write a book on that one subject alone. As this guide on how to make money online freelance writing is, by necessity, fairly high level, here are the basics.

  1. The niche(s) you choose should be in high demand.
  2. Your niche(s) should be a lucrative i.e. if you want to get paid well, your customers must have the resources to afford you. Think lawyers, doctors, technology, banking and finance and large companies.
  3. Your niche(s) should have the potential for repeat business.

Here are some examples of freelancing categories taken directly from Upwork.com, the largest freelancing network on the planet:

  • Web, Mobile & Software Dev
  •  IT & Networking
  •  Data Science & Analytics
  •  Engineering & Architecture
  •  Design & Creative
  •  Writing
  •  Translation
  •  Legal
  •  Admin Support
  •  Customer Service
  •  Sales & Marketing
  •  Accounting & Consulting

Within each of these categories, there are many subcategories. If we take writing, as just one example, it breaks down into:

  • Academic Writing & Research
  • Article & Blog Writing
  • Copywriting
  • Creative Writing
  • Editing & Proofreading
  • Grant Writing
  • Resumes & Cover Letters
  • Technical Writing
  • Web Content
  • Other – Writing

As you can see, there are multiple niches to choose from. While we’re on the subject, here’s some good advice about Upwork…


Don’t believe the Upwork hype!

When you get started freelance writing you’ll likely see a lot of freelancers, particularly writers, dismissing Upwork as a lowly paid content mill/ sweatshop where clients want to pay as little as possible for as much as possible.

Now, while I totally agree there are plenty of low ballers on Upwork, there are some magnificent jobs to be had as well.

I’ve personally picked up clients that have paid me $1,000’s and given me regular work. And, that’s exactly what you want. One client I sourced from Upwork pays me a monthly retainer of $3,000 like clockwork and is an absolute joy to work with.

Sift through the dirt and you’ll find the diamonds!

Here’s some proof of what you can earn on Upwork (I also have “direct” clients that I work with and invoice directly without going through job sites):

get started freelance writing


How to build your Upwork profile the right way

When it comes to your Upwork profile, there’s a right way and a wrong way to put it together.

My Upwork profile has helped me earn many $1,000’s on Upwork, and I’ve landed jobs that pay $125 /hr and even $3,000 monthly retainers.

Get this right, and you stand a good chance of landing work on the Upwork platform – PROVIDED you have the other pieces of the Upwork puzzle in place as well.

It’s not that difficult, and if you take it in stages, you can be succeeding on Upwork where others are failing miserably.

I read that on average you stand a 1 in14 chance of being successful when you bid for a job. Now I don’t know where they arrive at that number, but how you approach potential customers is SO critical the number varies hugely (more on that in another lesson). My personal strike rate is way better than 1 in14.

In this lesson, I’ll show you how to put together your Upwork profile in a way that gives you the best chance of success.

Read on and let’s get started.

The BIG mistake


Your Upwork profile is not about you!

That may sound a little odd. Of course it’s about you – it’s all about how great you are, your achievements, your education, your experience and why you’re better than the next candidate – right?

Yes and no.

Look, I’m not saying you won’t tell potential clients about yourself, of course you will, but you need to turn your thinking 180 degrees.

Waffling on about yourself will make you sound just like any other run of the mill applicant. You need to differentiate yourself in some way, you need to try to make a connection with the client.

Making the right connection with potential clients

When a potential client advertises a job on Upwork, they’ll likely get anywhere from 5 to 50 replies. What most freelancers don’t realize is they’ve blown their chances of getting hired right out of the gate.

Let’s start with what not to do:

Mistake #1

One of the biggest mistakes I see being made is writing in a deferential tone (bowing down to the prospect). This is huge.

Think about it. You’re a businessman running your own business, as is your prospect. A business relationship should be built on mutual respect and calling a prospect “sir” (as I’ve seen many times), immediately puts you on a lower level.

You’re equal to your prospect, so use language that reflects this. Never beg for work 🙂

Mistake #2

The second big mistake I see is immediately hitting your prospect with a long list of how great you are, your qualifications, why you’re the best thing since sliced bread and why they should hire you and no one else.

95%+ of freelancers do this and it’s wrong.

Your profile needs to make the right connection with a potential customer. You do this by talking about how you can help them and not by talking about yourself.

How do you make the right connection?

Okay, now we’ve covered what not to do, let’s get down to what is going to set your profile head and shoulders above the vast majority of your competition.

Focus on “YOU” the most important word in copywriting

  • Your profile should be centered around the client, try to use the word “you” as often as possible, make them feel good and make them the center of attention.
  • Make sure your profile is personal and friendly.
  • Explain clearly everything you can do to help their business.

Empathy & Emotion

  • Show you understand what the client wants and needs – try to get inside their head.
  • Use the same words and phrases you think your client might use – try to talk their language.
  • Your profile should target an emotional response from the client – does it make them feel confident about you? Does it trigger other emotions such as excitement, hope, relief. Does it connect?
  • Does your profile capture the client’s interest and make them nod with agreement as they read it?
  • Make sure it doesn’t contain anything that interrupts the flow or engenders a “No” thought in the client’s head.

Talk about benefits

  • Ensure your potential client clearly understands the benefits he’ll enjoy by working with you.
  • Try to answer the “what’s in it for me?” and “why should I care questions?”
  • Can clients clearly see that by trusting you with their business they’ll get the result they want, on-time and without fuss.

Readability

  • Make your first paragraph a single, attention-grabbing sentence.
  • Your profile should contain short paragraphs and sentences with plenty white space in between.
  • Use bullet points rather than long, rambling sentences.
  • Ideally, sentences should be no longer than two lines of normal text.
  • Don’t use large chunks of text in your profile, it just makes it more difficult for the client to read and will interrupt the flow.
  • Double check your profile is not full of boring facts – ensure it’s not dry and uninteresting to read.

Call to action

  • Have you told clients exactly what to do when they’ve finished reading your profile?

Keywords

  • Your profile should include keywords your client is likely searching for.

An example of a successful profile – PLEASE DO NOT DIRECTLY COPY

Here’s my current Upwork profile to inspire you and show you what a successful profile can look like.

Digital Marketing Strategist experienced in Copywriting, SMM & SEO

Do you have an unwavering vision of excellence for your business as I do for mine?

If you’re serious about working with a marketer and copywriter who can bring real value to your business, let’s talk.

If you look at my rate and think you can get the same professional results for 1/10th of the price, then we really shouldn’t waste each other’s time.

=== HERE’S WHAT MY UPWORK CLIENTS ARE SAYING ABOUT ME ===

▶ Les, you are worth every cent! This is brilliant work. Nice to work with a pro like you. – Grant Robb, Interpret.

▶ Les is professional and proactive in his work. I would choose Les again if I were to start my marketing strategy over. – Per Damgaard Husted, CEO Canecto APS

▶ Les was perfect to work with. He was creative, quick-witted, easy to communicate with and his sales writing paid attention to detail. I strongly recommend him. – Beryl Bucher, CEO Clinical Metrics, US

▶ The quality of Les’s work is fantastic and he’s so easy to work with. – Graham Cooper BSc. Econ – ACMA, CEO Quantum Strategic Excellence

▶ Les’s marketing strategy was simply awesome in every way. Would definitely ask Les to help [again] if he is available. Highly recommended. – Antonie Henning, Managing Director, Wanos Networks

I have many more testimonials just like these and dozens of 5* reviews right here on Upwork.

=== AVERAGE COPYWRITING – THERE’S NO EXCUSE FOR IT ===

Average or run of the mill copywriting just doesn’t cut it when it comes to YOUR marketing strategy. You understand there’s too much at stake, and anyway, there’s a glut of irrelevant “blah blah” out there already.

In a world full of marketing noise my job is to help you stand out from the crowd with copywriting that ignites your marketing strategy.

That’s why I don’t do average.

=== HOW I DO IT RIGHT ===

FACT: Your prospects first buy with emotion, and justify their buying decision with logic second.

This means your sales writing needs to tap into your prospects’ emotions above all else if it’s to effectively support your marketing efforts.

A relevant, emotional connection is the single most important ingredient of copywriting that has the potential to deliver the inquiries, sign-ups and customer conversions you need.

Therefore, it’s critical you build your marketing strategy on a foundation of copywriting that digs deep into the hopes, fears and aspirations of your ideal prospects.

Copywriting that shows how your solution is highly relevant and solves the problems your prospects worry about most is key.

Get this right, and you’ll build a predictable stream of leads with a marketing strategy that’s closely aligned with your prospects’ emotional triggers.

Manage these leads effectively, and you’ll convert them into loyal customers like clockwork.

=== YOUR PRODUCT OR SERVICE IS GREAT, SO WHAT? ===

FACT: Having an exceptional product alone just won’t cut it, not even close.

One of the biggest mistakes I see is lazy copywriting.

That is copywriting that dives straight into a product’s features without laying out the groundwork needed to make a close connection with the reader first.

I’m talking about the carefully crafted words necessary to get inside the head of your audience, for example, visitors to your website, prospects scanning a landing page, reading a sales letter or email.

=== IT HAPPENS ALL THE TIME ===

FACT: I’ve seen countless outstanding products stalled by copywriting that makes this one basic mistake

Sure, I understand the thinking that’s responsible for this common error.

You have an amazing product and you can’t wait to tell the world about all the fantastic features it has to offer.

=== HERE’S THE PROBLEM ===

Copywriting that doesn’t make the right emotional connections and clearly answer the “what’s in it for me?” or “why should I care?” questions is the kiss of death for your marketing strategy.

And, an ineffective marketing strategy will never support the vision of excellence you have for your business.

If I were to sum up effective copywriting in three little words, they would be:

● CONNECT – CONVINCE – CONVERT

I do have a very full schedule, but I’ll do my best to accommodate your copywriting or marketing strategy project if we’re a good fit for each other.

Hit the CONTACT button and let’s get started!

Notes:

To be successful on Upwork, you need to be professional throughout, and you should start with your profile.

Read it over at least 3 times – THOROUGHLY check it for spelling and grammar errors.

Then use the following tools on it:

Word text to speech

Microsoft Word has an excellent text to speech function that I use to check all my work.

Here’s a video on YouTube that will get you off on the right foot.

Grammarly

Get the free version of Grammarly (search on Google).

Use it on all your work.


Get tooled up

Get organized with the right tools from the start.

One of the biggest mistakes I made in my freelancing career was wasting countless hours re-inventing the wheel. I’m pretty good with excel spreadsheets and I spent ages constructing beautiful, functional spreadsheets for all manner of tasks – big, big mistake!

All I did was store up trouble for myself and wasted countless hours on tasks that were completely unnecessary.

Every tool you need to make money online freelance writing is available to you. Many of them are free.

But, just because some of these tools are free of charge, or very low cost, you shouldn’t underestimate how much they can help you in your freelancing business.

Here are a couple of examples of the type of tools you should consider:

CRM (Customer Relationship Manager) – you’ll find a decent CRM software, such as HubSpot CRM, invaluable. You might think it a bit of an overkill right at the start but trust me, once your business starts to grow you’ll be glad you organized it properly.

Accounts & Billing – presenting your clients with a professional invoice (when necessary) and keeping track of your income and expenditure is a necessity. Wave accounting is a good bet.


Getting paid by clients

Clients need to be able to pay you for the work you do. There are various options such as Payoneer, Paypal, Stripe etc. If you’re working through Upwork.com, they pay directly into Payoneer which is fantastic. The payment process is quick and easy. Payoneer also provides a Mastercard which you can use worldwide to pay for goods and services (small charge).

I recommend you start off by getting a Payoneer account set up – it’s what I use to accept payments from all over the world. Here’s the link:

PAYONEER ACCOUNT SETUP


Summing it all up

There’s no doubt about it, if you approach freelancing in the right way, armed with the right mindset and solid guidance (this website), you can definitely make money online freelance writing. You can take it as far as you want and shoot for six figures a year if that’s what motivates you.

Freelancing is not a get rich quick scheme. If you’re prepared to put in the effort, build and refine your business over time and continually educate yourself so you can deliver outstanding results to clients, you’re on the right track.

And, when all said and done, isn’t it better to work your own hours, control you’re own future and never again have to suffer the daily commute to a workplace you hate? I’ll let you answer that one…

My #1 recommendation to kickstart or grow your freelance writing business

31 thoughts on “Get started freelance writing”

  1. Hi Les, this is really a very interesting endeavor. You’re really starting to raise my interest in freelance writing so thanks for the guidance and all the tips. I will definitely have to study and learn up on freelance writing more before I start. One question I have for you is, are you a writer yourself by profession? If, for instance for my self, I’m not really a writer and I guess I am not completely confident in the quality of my writing if I decide to do freelance writing, do you have any suggestion as to how to improve or develop my skills? 

    I’m seriously considering this and I understand what you said in part 1 of this article, where having the right mindset is critically important. I myself am still on a journey of monetizing my online activity be it blogging, ecommerce, or all the plethora of opportunities that the Internet gives us, and have gone through the ups and downs. One thing I do realize is that no one will pay you for anything if you really do not give it a high quality of effort and time, so yes I’m still on this journey and keep pressing on until I become successful.

    I appreciate any further tips or guidance you can give. Maybe you have a part 3 coming up soon? c”,)

    • Hi Mark, good to hear you’re interested in freelance writing, it can be an interesting and lucrative way to make money online.

      I’m not originally a writer per say, I got my start by writing books for Amazon Kindle. Some of my early stuff wasn’t that good, but the practice I got improved my skills immensely.

      Tips I would give you – read as much as you can, think about what you’re reading and try to understand the writer’s style and mindset.

      You need to decide what kind of writing you’d like to do. That makes it much easier to home in on the skills you need to practice.

      Finally, take notes and develop “cheat sheets” you can refer back to in the future. They’re great memory joggers and can save you a ton of time!

      • Thanks for the tip Les. I’ve also been reading about that publishing in Amazon Kindle. I guess that is one way to practice to improve our writing skills. I’ll definitely take your advice. All the best!

        Cheers!

  2. I have tried writing to earn money online in the past, but I have to be honest with you, I was a little disorganised and I ended up letting down as many clients as I kept happy. I did make money at it – but I could of earned a lot more! 

    This article is excellent for writers like myself, who struggle to have some sort of plan in place to get the most out of the opportunities to write. 

    If I was looking to start all over again, with a clean slate, what would be the first step you recommend I take?

    • HI Chris, based on what you’ve shared with me here, I would seriously consider working out how you’re going to get yourself organized.

      Honestly, when you’re writing for a number of clients on a regular basis, you’ll get into one heck of a mess if you don’t have a system in place.

      Also, as you build your business out, you’ll want to show off examples of your work, what I call my “collateral”.

      If you’re disorganized and you can’t lay your hands on information quickly and easily you’ll be making a ton of extra work for yourself.

      Thanks for chipping in.

  3. Hello Les Blythe. Hope you are having a good time. Thank you for sharing this awesome post which guides me through making money online with freelance writing. Wow! I see that there is a great deal of money that can be made from freelancing. I have heard several times about it but I have not done any Before. I don’t even know if I can write Quality Contents. Are there resources one can use to write Quality Contents?

    • Hi Barry,

      to get started, there are a lot of resources you can find using a Google search and by studying what other people are writing in your chosen niche.

      You can definitely work out a “format” for different types of writing, say a blog post for example. Over the last couple of years, I’ve built a file of “cheat sheets” I refer to that refresh my memory about how to structure the various content I write.

  4. Hello Les,

    This is pure gold. Come to think of it, some writers tend to lead a rather disorganized and goalless life simply because there is no one bossing them around. I think this is so not good.

    Just like Angelo notes in the first comment, SMART goals should be applicable in every sphere of our lives, if we want to make an impact in whatever we do.

    I have read literally every blog post on FYF, I am ravenously hungry for more.

    Thanks again and all the best.

    Godfrey W.

    • Thanks for the comment Godfrey.

      It definitely pays to be organized, but it’s equally important to put a system in place that does what you need without overkill.

      At one time, I was using a full-blown CRM that, in the end, wasn’t really appropriate for my business. I’ve now trimmed my system down to Evernote and Google tasks (check out the Evernote Video Training on this site). With the CRM, I found myself wasting too much time filling in unnecessary fields and trying to use systems designed for larger, collaborative teams.

      Glad you’re getting value from FYF, I plan to deliver plenty more moving forward…

  5. Hello Les,

    This came just at the right time. At some point, I felt that you were talking to me directly. I am stuck in that vicious cycle of extremely low paying jobs. I have been writing since 2013 but mainly for people who outsource jobs from content mills.

    If these content mills pay peanuts to writers, then you can imagine what I am paid by those who subcontract me to work on the jobs that they get from such sites. This is definitely a new dawn for me and I am stopping at nothing.

    Thanks, Les, this is a life-saver.

    • I’m so glad my advice has been an inspiration for you. I can only imagine the rates you’ve been writing for being subcontracted for already lowly priced jobs.

      I do think the term “content mill” can be a bit of a misnomer. Yes, there are lowly paid jobs on sites like Upwork, but it’s not all bad news, and you certainly don’t have to engage with them…

      Here’s a quick screenshot from a job I’m working on this week @ $125/ hr (and it’s only Thursday).

      This is what is possible (and more) if you know how to position yourself correctly, get your cover letters right and do the necessary groundwork to build your credibility.

  6. Thanks for this informative post.  I think SMART goals are essential, not only for this particular topic, but in any area of life! What would you suggest I do if I was just starting out, I have no experience, no ratings or testimonials? I have tried to get started as a freelance writer in the past but I found this as a barrier to entry and I didn’t have anyone to turn to.

    • Hi Angelo, yes I think you do need to develop systems to keep you organized and focused.

      I hear what you’re saying when I started out I also had no experience, ratings or testimonials. But, you need to start somewhere and you can build all of these things over time.

      Here’s a tip. Say you get started on Upwork and you don’t have an example of a piece of work to show a potential client. What I did was figure out what they wanted and write about 200 words on a very similar topic. You then simply present this to them as a sample of your work (which it is) and you’re immediately on the right track.

      When you get a job (and you will) do a fantastic piece of work and ask for a 5* review. Voila, you now have one sample and one 5* review – you’re on your way.

      Rinse and repeat, build a reputation and up your rates asap.

      Hope it helps.

  7. The best advice I read here is, don’t swap one boss for the other, when you keep working for a boss, the only one who gets the real profit is your boss. I have a website, and I accept guest blogs, but for one, I am not paying the people who are writing a guest blog on my website, I offer them to share their website link, and I share their blog on my social media account. Can you tell me where or how to find the best websites who pay to write blogs for, Les?

    I hope to hear from you, Loes

    • Hi Loes,

      I think it’s very important that you don’t simply swap one boss for another when you start out freelancing. Always remember, YOU’RE the boss and that’s one of the reasons you took to freelancing in the first place 🙂

      To find websites to write blogs for I suggest you work out exactly what your niche is (you may have done this step already) and the try email outreach. I have found some of my best clients by simply reaching out by email.

      Remember though, if you don’t get a reply on the first attempt, you should follow up at least another 2-4 times. People are busy these days, but if they can see you’ll add value to their business, they won’t mind you getting in touch.

  8. Hi again Les and the more I read your advice on Freelance writing the more I do realise that this is really what I want to do. I only wish I had been able to find all this great information you have here a lot quicker. I am going to have another look at Upwork. Thank you again.

    • My pleasure Cheryl, I wish you every success.

      Remember to keep an eye on my blog as I’ll be adding plenty of useful advice and tips moving forward.

  9. Hey Les, I decided to check out your website on Freelance Writing.  Its pretty needed. The 1st thing that caught my eye was that this was a Part 2.  The overall scheme is very clear, Waaaaay better than my sites.  Working on it.  The first paragraph told me that there is money to be made in this field.  So I knew the site would elaborate on that, which is cool. 

    The subject of Freelance Writing is not that major or maybe it is.  But I’m curious.  When you decided to create this site did you want to focus more on your Freelance Writing or Helping others make money writing?  There are quite a few sites out there dealing with making money, however your site is very convenient in how it tells us you can do it thru simply Writing.  Not Bad. 

    I look forward to exploring more about Freelance Writing on your site. 

    Thanx Again for Sharing

    #SharingIsCaring 

    #BuildYourBusiness

    #SeeUAtTheTop

    -Tu

    • Hi there Tu,

      The purpose of my site is to help people get started working for themselves making a living online. Or, of course, to help them if they’re already started and stuck or confused.

      There are two methods I concentrate on – Freelance writing (how I make $1,000’s a month as a Freelance Copywriter) and Affiliate Marketing.

      What I do is use my experience to advise others, give out free tips and information while helping my visitors avoid the pitfalls and scams.

      Thanks for your post.

  10. To be a freelancer or own self business is a dream of many people. To be honest your post wants people that have interest in freelancing to learn from you or help them learn how to freelance writing. For me i feel to be a freelancer have to come from the background of what you know how to do. 

    Here is where my concern lies, like you said in your post that the learning is not for people who are not ready to be serious to learn. The good things about this post is that is for the people that already have interest in writing who needs this training or people that has started but needs to sell out themselves. So i suggest you target your publicity direct to such people, and i sure believe you will see them signing up for the training.

    • If I understand you correctly, you say you have to be a writer to become a writer, and I fundamentally disagree with that.

      When I started out I wasn’t a copywriter – I now earn $1,000’s a month from copywriting (and other writing).

      Beware of people telling you that you need to study copywriting for years to become good at it, nonsense.

      Beware of people telling you that you need to take hundreds of the classic sales pages and re-write them all by hand to internalize them, again, nonsense.

      You can become a half decent copywriter in a couple of months, that’s exactly what I did.

      I DO understand that if English isn’t your first language it can be tricky, and that’s something that might need some work.

      Once you learn how to write decent copy, the writing isn’t the hurdle most people fall at – it’s the marketing and charging enough for your work.

      Incidentally, if anyone reading this DOESN’T have English as THEIR first language and is struggling, please email me at les@freelanceyourfuture.com and I’ll point you to a resource that can help you.

  11. Hi Les, thank you so very much for this article. This is exactly what I was looking for and wanting to do. However when I joined Upwork I did it wrongly and it looks like I am the one looking for people to work for me. This is a great article and has made me want to pursue this further.

    I may come back to you with more questions about all of this.

    • Hey Cheryl,

      Yes, there are two sides to your profile on Upwork – one is the side where you seek out work as a freelancer, and the other is where you’re a client and look for people to do work for you.

      I’ve done both sides and here’s something very interesting I discovered.

      People think there’s a huge amount of competition on Upwork and it’s true there is. But, there’s a huge amount of opportunity that goes along with it. The thing is, most of the competition is very poor (easily 90% plus) and it’s relatively easy to outperform them.

      How?

      – Be professional in your profile, your portfolio and your cover letters for jobs
      – NEVER send in a cut and paste application for a job – you may as well not bother
      – Pay attention to detail
      – Hit or exceed deadlines
      – Get 5* reviews under your belt quickly. How? Ask for them. How? Use this (re-write in your own words):

      “I just wanted to mention how important 5* reviews are to my reputation here on Upwork. I truly hope you found my work to be 5*. If for any reason you think it’s not 5*, please let me know and I’ll do everything I can to make it so.”

      Finally, put together a profile that talks about a) How you understand their business b) What you can do to help them c) Why they should work with you.

      Model it on mine here (please don’t directly copy):

      https://www.upwork.com/fl/lesblythe

      Hope that all helps, and good luck!

  12. Hi Les, thank you for a great article. I think a lot of people are looking for ways to escape the 9-5 trap these days. 

    After moving me and my family to Spain I certainly see the values in a global business you can run from a laptop. Personally I am in affiliate marketing. How Long did it take you to make a fulltime income doing freelance work? Do you have other online income streams as well? 

    Best regards, 

    Stefan

    • Hi Stefan,

      I totally agree there’s huge value in building a business you can literally run from a laptop – and make a substantial income in the process. I’m also getting (back) into affiliate marketing now that my digital marketing agency is working well.

      I didn’t start out as an agency, I began by freelance writing and grew it from there. I started making a full-time income almost immediately, but the problem was the value of the jobs I did in the beginning. If you’re getting $40 for 1,300 words, it’s a lot of hard work to make a decent income.

      Plus, the work tends to be pretty boring – I wrote more than 40 articles on dog breeds!

      That’s why I recommend building a solid reputation and increasing your rates quickly in the early stages. It’s so important to understand your worth and charge accordingly!

      Thanks for your comment.

  13. Really good advice, Les, I like the idea of charging more as my business grows to get what I’m worth – very key.

    I really appreciate that Wave Accounting recommendation. I’m floored that it’s FREE for most of what I need.

    Hubspot CRM also looks important.

    I look forward to more of your articles and advice on freelancing and more tools, specifically to help me learn to write better.

     Very exciting.

    • Hey Alexander,

      Yes, charging more as your business grows and you increase your value to clients is very important.

      It’s surprisingly common for freelancers to make the mistake of “getting stuck in a a rut” and on a constant merry-go-round of low paying jobs – you just can’t earn decent money like that!

      One tool that will help you write better and l I would definitely recommend is Grammarly. I use it every day in my business and you can get started with their free version.

      Hope that helps.

  14. Hello,
    Thank you for your advice. I have a question in regards to freelance writing online: how do you market yourself in order to get chosen by employers?
    I’ve created an account on Fiverr and create one writting gig but noone is hiring me.
    And also, if your first language is not English, but your English is quite good but not perfect, could this be a problem?

    • Hi there,

      The first thing I would suggest is to stop thinking of yourself as an employee. You need to adopt the mindset of a business owner, solve your clients’ problems and deliver value.

      I understand it’s a challenge when you’re just starting out, especially if you’re writing and English isn’t your first language. It will take time to build up your credibility and for people to get to know you.

      Here’s what I suggest:

      1) Don’t concentrate just on Fiverr – people go there with the expectation of paying $5 and that’s not going to help you make any real money.
      2) Try to get on Upwork. You may start low, but over time you’ll build up your rate.
      3) Get on People per Hour as well.
      4) Most people don’t want to hear this – a website with your portfolio and testimonials will help your credibility no end (make the effort).
      5) Use cold email outreach to your ideal clients – it takes time but it works.

      Where you’re at now, you should be in a building phase. It will take time and effort, but if you’re serious about your business, it WILL be worth it!

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